Reviews

Theo Craveiro

In the dark, Theo Craveiro swims to a distant shore. It is night, and the only thing visible on the horizon are faint spots of light that flicker along a frail skyline.

By Teodoro Ferrer
Reviews

Theo Craveiro

By Teodoro Ferrer

In the dark, Theo Craveiro swims to a distant shore. It is night, and the only thing visible on the horizon are faint spots of light that flicker along a frail skyline.

October 31, 2012
Matías Duville

Like the ancient itinerant painters, Matías Duville (1974) recounts his investigations on the landscape through some fifty drawings, a video, an object and some photographs which are projected together with a soundtrack. The exhibition is called «Safari».

By Ana Martínez Quijano
Reviews

Matías Duville

By Ana Martínez Quijano

Like the ancient itinerant painters, Matías Duville (1974) recounts his investigations on the landscape through some fifty drawings, a video, an object and some photographs which are projected together with a soundtrack. The exhibition is called «Safari».

October 31, 2012
López-Ramos

The Situationists gave the name of détournement to an artistic practice which consisted in taking a consumer good and transforming it into an art object, in such a way that it would deny its own character as merchandise, thus subverting the imperative to consume that characterizes contemporary capitalism.

By Ernesto Menéndez-Conde
Reviews

López-Ramos

By Ernesto Menéndez-Conde

The Situationists gave the name of détournement to an artistic practice which consisted in taking a consumer good and transforming it into an art object, in such a way that it would deny its own character as merchandise, thus subverting the imperative to consume that characterizes contemporary capitalism.

October 31, 2012
Horacio Zabala

Argentinean artist Horacio Zabala opened “Reiterations” , his first solo exhibition at Henrique Faría Fine Art, with an investigation of acts of censorship and how they impact the relationship to one’s surroundings and nationality .

By Claire Breukel
Reviews

Horacio Zabala

By Claire Breukel

Argentinean artist Horacio Zabala opened “Reiterations” , his first solo exhibition at Henrique Faría Fine Art, with an investigation of acts of censorship and how they impact the relationship to one’s surroundings and nationality .

October 18, 2012
Marcela Astorga

Fronteras porosas , by Marcela Astorga (Mendoza, 1965), shows eight pieces which include sculptural objects and a pair of photographs, freezing moments of intriguing reading.

By Victoria Verlichak
Reviews

Marcela Astorga

By Victoria Verlichak

Fronteras porosas , by Marcela Astorga (Mendoza, 1965), shows eight pieces which include sculptural objects and a pair of photographs, freezing moments of intriguing reading.

October 18, 2012
Gustavo Díaz

In his first solo exhibition in the United States, “Justificación a priori” at The Mission Projects in Chicago, Argentine artist Gustavo Díaz (b. 1969) successfully intertwined his esoteric views on science, philosophy, and art history with transparent acrylic sculptures, futuristic modular reliefs, and vibrating optical drawings that dazzled the eyes.

By Pedro Vélez
Reviews

Gustavo Díaz

By Pedro Vélez

In his first solo exhibition in the United States, “Justificación a priori” at The Mission Projects in Chicago, Argentine artist Gustavo Díaz (b. 1969) successfully intertwined his esoteric views on science, philosophy, and art history with transparent acrylic sculptures, futuristic modular reliefs, and vibrating optical drawings that dazzled the eyes.

October 18, 2012
Henrique Oliveira

Henrique Oliveira is known for his installations that transform the space around them. They are wooden formations that seem to breathe in and out, organic bulges that defy the linear nature of architecture and reinvent constructions. Walls, floors and ceilings succumb to a new logic, a material presence impossible to ignore.

By Teodoro Ferrer
Reviews

Henrique Oliveira

By Teodoro Ferrer

Henrique Oliveira is known for his installations that transform the space around them. They are wooden formations that seem to breathe in and out, organic bulges that defy the linear nature of architecture and reinvent constructions. Walls, floors and ceilings succumb to a new logic, a material presence impossible to ignore.

October 11, 2012
Pablo Boneu

With a conceptually powerful body and a deeply subversive and anti-system soul, the exhibition "Instrucciones para destruir dinero" (“Instructions for destroying money”) by Pablo Boneu (1969, Argentina) is a pertinent metaphor for the status of money. A totemic theme reflected in great size via ground up dollars or bills from other countries.

By Pancho Marchiaro
Reviews

Pablo Boneu

By Pancho Marchiaro

With a conceptually powerful body and a deeply subversive and anti-system soul, the exhibition "Instrucciones para destruir dinero" (“Instructions for destroying money”) by Pablo Boneu (1969, Argentina) is a pertinent metaphor for the status of money. A totemic theme reflected in great size via ground up dollars or bills from other countries.

October 11, 2012
José Bedia

“Une Saison en Enfer”, (A Season in Hell), José Bedia’s exhibition at Fredric Snitzer Gallery, takes its name from the poète maudit Arthur Rimbaud’s long and only poem, and marks the most terrible descent journey of this artist who has based his practice on the pilgrimage to territories where myths oppose the narratives of the official history.

By Adriana Herrera
Reviews

José Bedia

By Adriana Herrera

“Une Saison en Enfer”, (A Season in Hell), José Bedia’s exhibition at Fredric Snitzer Gallery, takes its name from the poète maudit Arthur Rimbaud’s long and only poem, and marks the most terrible descent journey of this artist who has based his practice on the pilgrimage to territories where myths oppose the narratives of the official history.

October 11, 2012
Brígida Baltar

In 2005, Brígida Baltar had to leave her house in the Rio de Janeiro district of Botafogo During the fifteen years that preceded this event, the artist had lived and worked almost in a symbiosis with the old brick building, to the point of carving out her silhouette from the walls for the work Abrigo /Shelter (1996), or gathering rainwater from leaks in the roof later to use it in other works.

By Jacopo Crivelli Visconti
Reviews

Brígida Baltar

By Jacopo Crivelli Visconti

In 2005, Brígida Baltar had to leave her house in the Rio de Janeiro district of Botafogo During the fifteen years that preceded this event, the artist had lived and worked almost in a symbiosis with the old brick building, to the point of carving out her silhouette from the walls for the work Abrigo /Shelter (1996), or gathering rainwater from leaks in the roof later to use it in other works.

September 21, 2012
Interview with Ana Tiscornia

Ana Tiscornia (Montevideo, 1951) is a pivotal figure of the community of Latin American artists living in New York. She has developed a very personal and consistent body of work blending artistic practice, criticism, curatorship and teaching.

Reviews

Interview with Ana Tiscornia

Ana Tiscornia (Montevideo, 1951) is a pivotal figure of the community of Latin American artists living in New York. She has developed a very personal and consistent body of work blending artistic practice, criticism, curatorship and teaching.

September 21, 2012
Jorge Méndez Blake

“Ceboruco” tells a story − devised by Méndez Blake himself − that has its origin in the connection between the imaginary space of two volcanoes: the Popocatépetl, which plays a leading role in the plot of Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano, and the Ceboruco, the only volcano still active in the northeastern area of the volcanic axis of the Sierra Madre Occidental, in the Mexican state of Nayarit, whose eruptions over the past three thousand years have created an interesting landscape of volcanic rock.

By Luisa Reyes Retana
Reviews

Jorge Méndez Blake

By Luisa Reyes Retana

“Ceboruco” tells a story − devised by Méndez Blake himself − that has its origin in the connection between the imaginary space of two volcanoes: the Popocatépetl, which plays a leading role in the plot of Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano, and the Ceboruco, the only volcano still active in the northeastern area of the volcanic axis of the Sierra Madre Occidental, in the Mexican state of Nayarit, whose eruptions over the past three thousand years have created an interesting landscape of volcanic rock.

September 20, 2012
Teresa Serrano

The Mexican artist Teresa Serrano just opened her first solo exhibition in Spain at the Centro Atlántico de Arte Moderno (CAAM), in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

By Berta Sichel
Reviews

Teresa Serrano

By Berta Sichel

The Mexican artist Teresa Serrano just opened her first solo exhibition in Spain at the Centro Atlántico de Arte Moderno (CAAM), in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

September 20, 2012
Doris Salcedo

Doris Salcedo (b. Bogotá 1958) requested Tate Modern not to repair completely the concrete floor of its Turbine Hall, fissured for her installation in 2007. The giant crack − which earned her European acclaim − was only filled, leaving a visible scar that still reminds us of the abyss that exists between the value of life in the north and in the south, in the First World and in its periphery.

By Dolores Galindo
Reviews

Doris Salcedo

By Dolores Galindo

Doris Salcedo (b. Bogotá 1958) requested Tate Modern not to repair completely the concrete floor of its Turbine Hall, fissured for her installation in 2007. The giant crack − which earned her European acclaim − was only filled, leaving a visible scar that still reminds us of the abyss that exists between the value of life in the north and in the south, in the First World and in its periphery.

September 20, 2012
Guillermo Kuitca

Guillermo Kuitca’s (Buenos Aires, 1961) London solo show at the prestigious Hauser & Wirth Gallery marked the definitive presence of Latin American art in the British capital. Kuitca, who has shown in the course of his career a growing interest in maps and architectonic diagrams, incorporated on this occasion new central motifs to his cartographic traces aimed at questioning the perception of the social spaces we inhabit.

By Dolores Galindo
Reviews

Guillermo Kuitca

By Dolores Galindo

Guillermo Kuitca’s (Buenos Aires, 1961) London solo show at the prestigious Hauser & Wirth Gallery marked the definitive presence of Latin American art in the British capital. Kuitca, who has shown in the course of his career a growing interest in maps and architectonic diagrams, incorporated on this occasion new central motifs to his cartographic traces aimed at questioning the perception of the social spaces we inhabit.

August 30, 2012
Isabel Muñoz

The Spanish photographer Isabel Muñoz knew “La Bestia” (“The Beast”) closely and portrayed its entrails. This was the name given by immigrants from Central America – mostly from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador – to the freight train which has, for years, transported those who traveled northward through Mexico, trying to reach the border with the United States as stowaways.

By Willy Castellanos Simons
Reviews

Isabel Muñoz

By Willy Castellanos Simons

The Spanish photographer Isabel Muñoz knew “La Bestia” (“The Beast”) closely and portrayed its entrails. This was the name given by immigrants from Central America – mostly from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador – to the freight train which has, for years, transported those who traveled northward through Mexico, trying to reach the border with the United States as stowaways.

August 29, 2012
Marta Minujín

After years of mentioning Minuphone every time I wrote about Marta Minujín − for example, in Arte al Día 134, when referring to her retrospective in 2010 −, the author of these lines confirmed the playful sensory effects of the telephone booth created by the artist in 1967.

By Verlichak, Victoria
Reviews

Marta Minujín

By Verlichak, Victoria

After years of mentioning Minuphone every time I wrote about Marta Minujín − for example, in Arte al Día 134, when referring to her retrospective in 2010 −, the author of these lines confirmed the playful sensory effects of the telephone booth created by the artist in 1967.

August 16, 2012
Elías Crespin

Circles, squares, pentagons, waves and lines moved in undulations and rhythm to the pull of transparent, mechanized nylon threads that triggered their choreographed movement.

Reviews

Elías Crespin

Circles, squares, pentagons, waves and lines moved in undulations and rhythm to the pull of transparent, mechanized nylon threads that triggered their choreographed movement.

August 16, 2012
Friends With Benefits

“Friends with Benefits” , curated by Carla Camacho and Drew Moody, translated into a clinical and incongruous presentation of painting, collage, sculpture, an installation and two videos, at Lehman Maupin’s Lower East Side gallery.

By Claire Breukel
Reviews

Friends With Benefits

By Claire Breukel

“Friends with Benefits” , curated by Carla Camacho and Drew Moody, translated into a clinical and incongruous presentation of painting, collage, sculpture, an installation and two videos, at Lehman Maupin’s Lower East Side gallery.

July 31, 2012
Carlos Amorales

Present-day art breaks barriers later to confine itself within new boundaries. It confuses the viewers, induces them to reflection, and shows the unreasonableness that surrounds them. Carlos Amorales − Mexico 1970 − has this capacity to make people reflect about someone or something.

By Patricia Avena Navarro
Reviews

Carlos Amorales

By Patricia Avena Navarro

Present-day art breaks barriers later to confine itself within new boundaries. It confuses the viewers, induces them to reflection, and shows the unreasonableness that surrounds them. Carlos Amorales − Mexico 1970 − has this capacity to make people reflect about someone or something.

July 31, 2012
Félix Curto

For Félix Curto (Salamanca, España, 1967), Mexico is inherent in his way of viewing the world. During over ten years he has completed residencies in that country, where he has been exposed to a social and cultural reality that has fascinated him, exploring a political and economic world that is surely not to be found anywhere else in the world.

By Álvaro de Benito Fernández
Reviews

Félix Curto

By Álvaro de Benito Fernández

For Félix Curto (Salamanca, España, 1967), Mexico is inherent in his way of viewing the world. During over ten years he has completed residencies in that country, where he has been exposed to a social and cultural reality that has fascinated him, exploring a political and economic world that is surely not to be found anywhere else in the world.

July 12, 2012
Regina José Galindo

Perfomance artist Regina José Galindo (Guatemala City, Guatemala, 1974) may be considered a fundamental figure when attempting to understand action art in Central America and the influence of the eternal violence floating upon the countries of the region.

By Álvaro de Benito Fernández
Reviews

Regina José Galindo

By Álvaro de Benito Fernández

Perfomance artist Regina José Galindo (Guatemala City, Guatemala, 1974) may be considered a fundamental figure when attempting to understand action art in Central America and the influence of the eternal violence floating upon the countries of the region.

July 12, 2012
Pablo Flaiszman

A print is a drawing, and that is perhaps the most important thing about it; yet it is a drawing in which technique plays a leading role. The technique used in printmaking is laborious and complex, and its end result is always enveloped in mystery and unpredictability.

By Patricia Avena Navarro
Reviews

Pablo Flaiszman

By Patricia Avena Navarro

A print is a drawing, and that is perhaps the most important thing about it; yet it is a drawing in which technique plays a leading role. The technique used in printmaking is laborious and complex, and its end result is always enveloped in mystery and unpredictability.

June 13, 2012
Cinthia Marcelle

The new generations abide by icons and images: they try to convey ideas. Each artist, in his/her day, has a particular concern; at present these concerns are marked by a modernism that is dissolving. Cinthia Marcelle nourishes a temperament pervaded with irony.

By Patricia Avena Navarro
Reviews

Cinthia Marcelle

By Patricia Avena Navarro

The new generations abide by icons and images: they try to convey ideas. Each artist, in his/her day, has a particular concern; at present these concerns are marked by a modernism that is dissolving. Cinthia Marcelle nourishes a temperament pervaded with irony.

June 13, 2012
Pablo Reinoso

The installation presented by Pablo Reinoso in Fundación YPF’s space, Arte en la Torre, provides the viewer with a double gratification: The work Fútbol 5 en la Torre adds to the great power of visual attraction the narration of the creative process, an explicit testimony of the work’s gestation written by the artist himself.

By Ana Martínez Quijano
Reviews

Pablo Reinoso

By Ana Martínez Quijano

The installation presented by Pablo Reinoso in Fundación YPF’s space, Arte en la Torre, provides the viewer with a double gratification: The work Fútbol 5 en la Torre adds to the great power of visual attraction the narration of the creative process, an explicit testimony of the work’s gestation written by the artist himself.

June 13, 2012
Ricardo Piglia-Eduardo Stupía

In the face of the power of the new multimedia text supports, the beautiful volume Ricardo Piglia-Eduardo Stupía. Fragments of a diary appears as a statement on the permanence of the printed book. Piglia (Argentina, 1941) has kept a private diary for over 50 years and Stupía (Argentina, 1951) has been in the public scene since his first solo show in 1973. At the intersection of the artistic sensibilities of these authors, volume and show share the intensity of poetry and the fertile discomfort of critical thought.

By Victoria Verlichak
Reviews

Ricardo Piglia-Eduardo Stupía

By Victoria Verlichak

In the face of the power of the new multimedia text supports, the beautiful volume Ricardo Piglia-Eduardo Stupía. Fragments of a diary appears as a statement on the permanence of the printed book. Piglia (Argentina, 1941) has kept a private diary for over 50 years and Stupía (Argentina, 1951) has been in the public scene since his first solo show in 1973. At the intersection of the artistic sensibilities of these authors, volume and show share the intensity of poetry and the fertile discomfort of critical thought.

June 13, 2012
Moris

The work presented by Moris (Israel Meza Moreno) is a constant double play, a sort of glossary around the daily life of Mexico City simultaneously altered, infringed, evidenced, and whose risk zones or stability are increasingly less identifiable.

By Fernando Carabajal
Reviews

Moris

By Fernando Carabajal

The work presented by Moris (Israel Meza Moreno) is a constant double play, a sort of glossary around the daily life of Mexico City simultaneously altered, infringed, evidenced, and whose risk zones or stability are increasingly less identifiable.

June 13, 2012
Jesús “Bubu” Negrón

Even though he was very creative since he was a child, it was not clear to Jesús “Bubu” Negrón – one of the most important conceptual artists of his generation in Latin America – “what being an artist was about.” He discovered it as an art student in San Juan, when he intervened in a totally abandoned bronze statue – a sculpture of Puerto Rico’s first world champion, Sixto Escobar.

By Manuel Alvarez Lezama
Reviews

Jesús “Bubu” Negrón

By Manuel Alvarez Lezama

Even though he was very creative since he was a child, it was not clear to Jesús “Bubu” Negrón – one of the most important conceptual artists of his generation in Latin America – “what being an artist was about.” He discovered it as an art student in San Juan, when he intervened in a totally abandoned bronze statue – a sculpture of Puerto Rico’s first world champion, Sixto Escobar.

June 13, 2012
María Thereza Negreiros

Perhaps one of the most controversial careers in Latin American avant-garde is that of Colombian-Brazilian artist María Thereza Negreiros (Maués, 1930); her itinerary evolves in an unusual way in the artistic contemporary movement of the continent.

By Jesús Rosado
Reviews

María Thereza Negreiros

By Jesús Rosado

Perhaps one of the most controversial careers in Latin American avant-garde is that of Colombian-Brazilian artist María Thereza Negreiros (Maués, 1930); her itinerary evolves in an unusual way in the artistic contemporary movement of the continent.

June 13, 2012
Clemencia Labin

The works of Venezuelan artist Clemencia Labin (Maracaibo, 1946), who has lived in Germany for over 20 years, maintain strong links with her home town, as well as references from it, both concerning the thematic and the formal aspects, in spite of the distance and the time gone by since she left it.

By Amalia Caputo
Reviews

Clemencia Labin

By Amalia Caputo

The works of Venezuelan artist Clemencia Labin (Maracaibo, 1946), who has lived in Germany for over 20 years, maintain strong links with her home town, as well as references from it, both concerning the thematic and the formal aspects, in spite of the distance and the time gone by since she left it.

June 13, 2012
Leticia Ramos

Leticia Ramos is not a photographer in the traditional sense. While her medium is photographic, with images and light printed on a surface, she is more concerned with documenting the impact the world has on a lens, or the absence of a lens, and the passage of time and variations of color as subject matter.

By Teodoro Ferrer
Reviews

Leticia Ramos

By Teodoro Ferrer

Leticia Ramos is not a photographer in the traditional sense. While her medium is photographic, with images and light printed on a surface, she is more concerned with documenting the impact the world has on a lens, or the absence of a lens, and the passage of time and variations of color as subject matter.

June 13, 2012
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