BUENOS AIRES – MALBA REOPENS WITH TWO EXHIBITIONS

Today, Thursday, November 5, the MALBA opens its doors after almost eight months of being closed. The first week (until Wednesday 11/11) admission will be free with prior online reservation www.malba.org.ar

BUENOS AIRES – MALBA REOPENS WITH TWO EXHIBITIONS

The current exhibitions include "Constelaciones" by Remedios Varo which continues until February 2021, and the new Collection exhibition "“Latinoamérica al sur del Sur” (Latin America south from South)

 

READ MORE: REMEDIOS VARO IN MALBA 

 

LATIN AMERICA SOUTH FROM SOUTH - PERMANENT COLLECTION

This new exhibition of the Malba Collection begins with the oldest objects in the museum's collection and ends with those corresponding to the new millennium. This wide temporal arc is structured in ten nuclei that rearticulate the collection's narrative based on key themes in the history of 20th century Latin American art, linking them to present-day concerns such as the preservation of the environment, the participation of women, the rights of ethnic and sexual minorities and the appropriation of cultural heritage in the construction of the memory of a nation.

This narrow selection of works highlights two comprehensive heritage collections dedicated to Argentine artists Xul Solar and Antonio Berni. Within each of the nuclei, chronologically organized, central pieces of the collection are included along with a selection of documents that broadens the understanding of the context of their production. The works of artists such as Tarsila do Amaral, Emiliano Di Cavalcanti, Lygia Clark, Rafael Barradas, León Ferrari, Raquel Forner, Joaquín Torres García, Luchita Hurtado, Frida Kahlo, Hélio Oiticica, Amelia Peláez, Emilio Pettoruti, Diego Rivera, Wifredo Lam, Marisol and Maria Martins, among others, dialogue with contemporary work showing how the concerns of the past continue to be valid and how the future remains open to new readings and multiple lines of collecting.

Although this chronological rearticulation with insertions of the present that break it offers a panorama of the main developments in Latin American art, it does so from the prism of a perspective located in Argentina. History is not a detached story, nor is it written from a neutral or aseptic point of enunciation. This staging of the Collection alludes to that context by modeling a narrative about Latin America from the place where we are located: South from South.